Gnadenau Mennonite Brethren Church (Flowing Well, Saskatchewan, Canada)

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Flowing Well, SK. In 1955 there were 39 members; in 1965, 28. The congregation dissolved in 1968. It had been affiliated with the Saskatchewan Conference of Mennonite Brethren Churches, the Canadian Conference of Mennonite Brethren Churches and the General Conference of Mennonite Brethren Churches.

The congregation began services in 1907, and formally organized in 1910. The first building was occupied in 1913. John F. Harms is considered the founding leader of the group. The congregation originated through immigration from the United States. Leaders prior to 1950 included S.L. Hodel, Isaac Toews, John E. Priebe and William Buller.

The congregation merged with Elim Mennonite Brethren Church at Hodgeville in 1968.


Bibliography

Mennonite Brethren Herald (27 May 1988): 63.

Toews, John A. A History of the Mennonite Brethren Church: Pilgrims and Pioneers. Fresno, CA, 1975: 160.



Author(s) Jacob I. Regehr
Marlene Epp
Date Published August 1986


Cite This Article

MLA style

Regehr, Jacob I. and Marlene Epp. "Gnadenau Mennonite Brethren Church (Flowing Well, Saskatchewan, Canada)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. August 1986. Web. 16 Jul 2019. https://gameo.org/index.php?title=Gnadenau_Mennonite_Brethren_Church_(Flowing_Well,_Saskatchewan,_Canada)&oldid=56760.

APA style

Regehr, Jacob I. and Marlene Epp. (August 1986). Gnadenau Mennonite Brethren Church (Flowing Well, Saskatchewan, Canada). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 16 July 2019, from https://gameo.org/index.php?title=Gnadenau_Mennonite_Brethren_Church_(Flowing_Well,_Saskatchewan,_Canada)&oldid=56760.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 2, p. 530. All rights reserved.


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