Difference between revisions of "Living Light Mennonite Church (Washington Boro, Pennsylvania, USA)"

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Masonville Mennonite Church (Mennonite Church USA), Manor Township, [[Lancaster County (Pennsylvania, USA)|Lancaster County]], PA, is one of the older [[Lancaster Mennonite Conference (Mennonite Church USA)|Lancaster Conference]] congregations. A meetinghouse was built here in 1760, long known as [[Bachman Mennonite Meetinghouse (Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, USA)|Bachman's]] because it was built on land donated by Christian Baughman. In 1893 a new brick meetinghouse was erected on nearby land and the name changed to Masonville. Christian Kauffman (1765-1840) was one of the first bishops in the immediate area. The congregation was a part of the Manor circuit. In 1954 Christian K. Lehman was bishop with Benjamin Miller as preacher. The membership was 162. Slackwater, formerly an outpost of Masonville, became an independent congregation with 26 members in 1954 and Frank K. Garman as pastor. In 2005 Masonville had 99 members, with J. Wilmer Eby and Robert L. Kanagy as pastors.  
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Masonville Mennonite Church (Mennonite Church USA), Manor Township, [[Lancaster County (Pennsylvania, USA)|Lancaster County]], PA, is one of the older [[Lancaster Mennonite Conference (Mennonite Church USA)|Lancaster Conference]] congregations. A meetinghouse was built here in 1760, long known as [[Bachman Mennonite Meetinghouse (Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, USA)|Bachman's]] because it was built on land donated by Christian Baughman. In 1893 a new brick meetinghouse was erected on nearby land and the name changed to Masonville. Christian Kauffman (1765-1840) was one of the first bishops in the immediate area. The congregation was a part of the Manor circuit. In 1954 Christian K. Lehman was bishop with Benjamin Miller as preacher. The membership was 162. Slackwater, formerly an outpost of Masonville, became an independent congregation with 26 members in 1954 and Frank K. Garman as pastor. In 2005 Masonville had 99 members, with J. Wilmer Eby and Robert L. Kanagy as pastors.
 
 
 
 
 
{{GAMEO_footer|hp=Vol. 3, p. 535|date=1957|a1_last=Landis|a1_first=Ira D|a2_last= |a2_first= }}
 
{{GAMEO_footer|hp=Vol. 3, p. 535|date=1957|a1_last=Landis|a1_first=Ira D|a2_last= |a2_first= }}

Revision as of 19:55, 20 August 2013

Masonville Mennonite Church (Mennonite Church USA), Manor Township, Lancaster County, PA, is one of the older Lancaster Conference congregations. A meetinghouse was built here in 1760, long known as Bachman's because it was built on land donated by Christian Baughman. In 1893 a new brick meetinghouse was erected on nearby land and the name changed to Masonville. Christian Kauffman (1765-1840) was one of the first bishops in the immediate area. The congregation was a part of the Manor circuit. In 1954 Christian K. Lehman was bishop with Benjamin Miller as preacher. The membership was 162. Slackwater, formerly an outpost of Masonville, became an independent congregation with 26 members in 1954 and Frank K. Garman as pastor. In 2005 Masonville had 99 members, with J. Wilmer Eby and Robert L. Kanagy as pastors.


Author(s) Ira D Landis
Date Published 1957


Cite This Article

MLA style

Landis, Ira D. "Living Light Mennonite Church (Washington Boro, Pennsylvania, USA)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1957. Web. 20 Sep 2018. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Living_Light_Mennonite_Church_(Washington_Boro,_Pennsylvania,_USA)&oldid=89469.

APA style

Landis, Ira D. (1957). Living Light Mennonite Church (Washington Boro, Pennsylvania, USA). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 20 September 2018, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Living_Light_Mennonite_Church_(Washington_Boro,_Pennsylvania,_USA)&oldid=89469.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 3, p. 535. All rights reserved.


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