Roseland Mennonite Church (Roseland, Nebraska, USA)

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Roseland Mennonite Church in Roseland, Nebraska on 6 July 1948.
Source: Mennonite Community Photograph Collection, The Congregation (HM4-134 Box 1 photo 010.6-20).
Mennonite Church USA Archives, Goshen, Indiana
.

Roseland Mennonite Church, located near Roseland, Nebraska, a member of the Iowa-Nebraska Conference, was organized on 20 March 1880, with 26 members, with Albrecht Schiffler as bishop and Samuel W. Lapp as deacon. A meetinghouse was built about two years later, replaced in 1898 by a new one, at which time the membership numbered 160. Daniel Lapp was ordained bishop. Ministers who have served the congregation are John L. Reasoner, Jonas Nice, Andrew Good, John M. Nunemaker, Abraham Stauffer, Samuel G. Lapp, Noah Ebersole, J. Kore Zook, Edward Diener, and Alton Miller. Missionaries from this church sent to India were Mahlon C. Lapp, Jacob Burkhard, George Lapp, Esther Ebersole Lapp, and Velma Lapp Hostetler.

In 1957 the bishop was Peter R. Kennel, and the membership was 17.


Author(s) Sarah Schiffler Burkhard
Date Published 1959


Cite This Article

MLA style

Burkhard, Sarah Schiffler. "Roseland Mennonite Church (Roseland, Nebraska, USA)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1959. Web. 15 Aug 2018. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Roseland_Mennonite_Church_(Roseland,_Nebraska,_USA)&oldid=116842.

APA style

Burkhard, Sarah Schiffler. (1959). Roseland Mennonite Church (Roseland, Nebraska, USA). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 15 August 2018, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Roseland_Mennonite_Church_(Roseland,_Nebraska,_USA)&oldid=116842.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 4, p. 359. All rights reserved.


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