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Bair Mennonite Meetinghouse, 2013.
Source: Richard Herr

The Bair Mennonite Meetinghouse (Mennonite Church) is located three miles (six km) east of Hanover, York County, Pennsylvania. On 14 May 1775 Michael Danner, Sr., of Hanover, a York County Commissioner when the county was laid out, obtained from the Penn heirs with preachers John Shenk and Jacob Keagy, deacons John Welty and James Miller, 12 acres for a meetinghouse, schoolhouse, and burying ground. Possibly the Lutherans and Reformed had an interest in the schoolhouse. The first meetinghouse was used until 1860, and the second house until 1908, when the house used in the 1950s was erected. It was a part of the Hostetter-Hanover circuit of the Lancaster Mennonite Conference of which Richard Danner was bishop in the 1950s. The circuit membership was 122.

In the fall of 1979, the Bairs-Hostetter congregation requested a transfer from the Lancaster Conference to the Mid-Atlantic Mennonite Fellowship (MAMF). This request was granted in the spring of 1980.

For the joint history of the Bair-Hostetter-Hanover fellowship see Bairs-Hostetters Mennonite Church (Littlestown, Pennsylvania, USA).

[edit] Additional Information

Address: 6925 York Road, Spring Grove, Pa.

[edit] Maps

Map:Bair Mennonite Meetinghouse (Spring Grove, Pennsylvania)


Author(s) Ira D Landis
Date Published 1955


[edit] Cite This Article

MLA style

Landis, Ira D. "Bair Mennonite Meetinghouse (Spring Grove, Pennsylvania, USA)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1955. Web. 24 Nov 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Bair_Mennonite_Meetinghouse_(Spring_Grove,_Pennsylvania,_USA)&oldid=116774.

APA style

Landis, Ira D. (1955). Bair Mennonite Meetinghouse (Spring Grove, Pennsylvania, USA). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 24 November 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Bair_Mennonite_Meetinghouse_(Spring_Grove,_Pennsylvania,_USA)&oldid=116774.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 1, p. 214. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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