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Boulder Mennonite Church, 2010. Photo by H. Unrau
During the late 1950s and early 1960s, a small informal group of four or five Mennonite families known as the Boulder Mennonite Fellowship began meeting in homes for worship, study, and fellowship. By December 1964 the group, most of whom were members and active participants at Arvada Mennonite Church, and about 15 University of Colorado students, was meeting every other Sunday evening at the Home Savings and Loan Association building in Boulder. In March 1965, after considerable discussion, the Boulder Mennonite Fellowship decided not to establish a formal congregation.

A Mennonite church was started in Boulder, Colorado, in September 1984 after David Habegger, church planter for the Western District Conference (then General Conference Mennonite Church), conducted a study of the area, noting the university setting, the interest people had in justice and peace issues, and the number of Mennonites who drove long distances to attend Mennonite churches in Arvada and Denver. The conference called Marilyn Miller as church planter, and a small group of people from the Arvada and First Mennonite (of Denver) churches joined in establishing a congregation.  With substantial support from the Western District Conference they purchased a building across from the University of Colorado in January 1985. Rooms were rented out to various peace and justice groups to help pay the mortgage. On 24 November 1985 the church had a charter service with 30 persons covenanting to membership.

Steve Goering, later joined in co-ministry by his wife Susan Ortman Goering, began as the church’s second full time pastor in October 1989. The congregation’s membership and average attendance was about 60 in 1989.  By late 1994 average Sunday morning worship service attendance had grown to 80-85, and in 1999 the congregation’s membership was 78, with an average Sunday morning attendance of 95.  Under the pastoral leadership of the Goerings a Voluntary Service unit and a Victim Offender Restoration Program office were added to the church.  In 2004 the church building was sold and a structure almost twice as large was purchased at 3910 Table Mesa Drive in Boulder.  In 2005, Karen Cox was called out of the congregation to become pastor. The congregation, which became a charter member of the Mountain States Mennonite Conference (MCUSA) in 2006, is dually-affiliated with the Church of the Brethren. In 2007 the congregation’s average Sunday morning attendance was 70.

[edit] Bibliography

Unrau, Harlan D. Missional Anabaptist Ministry in an Urban Setting: A History of Boulder Mennonite Church, 1984-2009.

Unrau, Harlan D. In Pursuit of Land, Health and Mission: A History of Mennonites in the Mountain States Region. Printed in Canada by Blitzprint, Inc.  2007.

[edit] Additional Information

Address:  3910 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, Colorado 80305

Telephone:  303-443-3889

Website:  www.bouldermennonite.org/

Denominational Affiliations:

Mountain States Mennonite Conference

Mennonite Church USA

Church of the Brethren

Boulder Mennonite Church Ministers

Marilyn Miller September 1984 – September 1989
Eva Klink (Interim) September – October 1989
Steve Goering October 1989 – August 1991
Steve and Susan Ortman Goering (Co-pastors) August 1991 – May 2004
Merv and Jane Dick (Interim Co-pastors) July 2004 – June 2005
Karen Cox August 2005 --

[edit] Maps

Map:Boulder Mennonite Church (Boulder, Colorado)


Author(s) Harlan Unrau
Date Published March 2010


[edit] Cite This Article

MLA style

Unrau, Harlan. "Boulder Mennonite Church (Boulder, Colorado, USA)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. March 2010. Web. 24 Oct 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Boulder_Mennonite_Church_(Boulder,_Colorado,_USA)&oldid=94107.

APA style

Unrau, Harlan. (March 2010). Boulder Mennonite Church (Boulder, Colorado, USA). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 24 October 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Boulder_Mennonite_Church_(Boulder,_Colorado,_USA)&oldid=94107.




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