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  [[File:Hunsicker_Henry_A_MennYearb.jpg|300px|thumb|right|''Henry A. Hunsicker  
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[[File:Hunsicker_Henry_A_MennYearb.jpg|300px|thumb|right|''Henry A. Hunsicker
  
Mennonite Year Book &  
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Mennonite Year Book &
  
Almanac  
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Almanac'']]    In 1851 the bishops Abraham Hunsicker and Israel Beidler and the preachers Henry A. Hunsicker and Abraham H, Grater separated from [[Oberholtzer, John H. (1809-1895)|John H. Oberholtzer]]'s [[East Pennsylvania Conference of the Mennonite Church|Conference in Eastern Pennsylvania]] (later known as [[General Conference Mennonite Church (GCM)|General Conference Mennonite Church]]). "But having a majority of the members and friends, both in [[Phoenixville (Pennsylvania, USA)|Phoenixville]] and in [[Germantown Mennonite Settlement (Pennsylvania, USA)|Germantown]] to stand by us, we continued our services at both these places until 1875. After the Meeting Houses in Skippack and Providence were closed against us, we held services at school houses, and in some of the neighboring churches opened to us, until 1854 when we built a church at Freeland, now Collegeville, which was essentially a non-sectarian church, to be open for ministers in good standing in our own and other denominations, who chose to help the church of Christ. Our Church, as well as our school, were both flourishing. We added to the Ministry during these years, Francis Hunsicker, Jarret T. Preston, and Joseph H. Hendricks." (Quotation from Henry A. Hunsicker in the 1907 <em>Mennonite Year Book and Almanac</em>, p. 24.)
 
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'']]    In 1851 the bishops Abraham Hunsicker and Israel Beidler and the preachers Henry A. Hunsicker and Abraham H, Grater separated from [[Oberholtzer, John H. (1809-1895)|John H. Oberholtzer]]'s [[East Pennsylvania Conference of the Mennonite Church|Conference in Eastern Pennsylvania]] (later known as [[General Conference Mennonite Church (GCM)|General Conference Mennonite Church]]). "But having a majority of the members and friends, both in [[Phoenixville (Pennsylvania, USA)|Phoenixville]] and in [[Germantown Mennonite Settlement (Pennsylvania, USA)|Germantown]] to stand by us, we continued our services at both these places until 1875. After the Meeting Houses in Skippack and Providence were closed against us, we held services at school houses, and in some of the neighboring churches opened to us, until 1854 when we built a church at Freeland, now Collegeville, which was essentially a non-sectarian church, to be open for ministers in good standing in our own and other denominations, who chose to help the church of Christ. Our Church, as well as our school, were both flourishing. We added to the Ministry during these years, Francis Hunsicker, Jarret T. Preston, and Joseph H. Hendricks." (Quotation from Henry A. Hunsicker in the 1907 <em>Mennonite Year Book and Almanac</em>, p. 24.)
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The church established by the Hunsicker group in 1854 was called the "Trinity Christian Society." In 1888 Hendricks and his church were received into the Reformed Church, which act displeased Henry A. Hunsicker.
 
The church established by the Hunsicker group in 1854 was called the "Trinity Christian Society." In 1888 Hendricks and his church were received into the Reformed Church, which act displeased Henry A. Hunsicker.
  
 
The Hunsicker group were for a time known as Reformed Mennonites, at least they were called Reformed Mennonites at Germantown. But this name was already used by a radical sect of Mennonites in Lancaster County, the followers of [[Herr, John (1782-1850)|John Herr]], and the "Reformed" Mennonites of Germantown soon became General Conference Mennonites. Indeed the whole Hunsicker group disintegrated. The Collegeville Church became Reformed, the Lutherans acquired the Phoenixville property, and the Germantown Church united with the [[Eastern District Conference (Mennonite Church USA)|Eastern District]] of the General Conference Mennonites. Both Henry A. and Francis R. S. Hunsicker became Presbyterians.
 
The Hunsicker group were for a time known as Reformed Mennonites, at least they were called Reformed Mennonites at Germantown. But this name was already used by a radical sect of Mennonites in Lancaster County, the followers of [[Herr, John (1782-1850)|John Herr]], and the "Reformed" Mennonites of Germantown soon became General Conference Mennonites. Indeed the whole Hunsicker group disintegrated. The Collegeville Church became Reformed, the Lutherans acquired the Phoenixville property, and the Germantown Church united with the [[Eastern District Conference (Mennonite Church USA)|Eastern District]] of the General Conference Mennonites. Both Henry A. and Francis R. S. Hunsicker became Presbyterians.
 
 
 
= Bibliography =
 
= Bibliography =
 
Hunsicker, Abraham. A Statement of Facts, and Summary of Views on Morals and Religion, as Related with Suspension from the Mennonite Meeting 1851. Philadelphia, PA, 1851.
 
Hunsicker, Abraham. A Statement of Facts, and Summary of Views on Morals and Religion, as Related with Suspension from the Mennonite Meeting 1851. Philadelphia, PA, 1851.
 
 
 
{{GAMEO_footer|hp=Vol. 4, pp. 1095-1096|date=1959|a1_last=Wenger|a1_first=John C|a2_last=|a2_first=}}
 
{{GAMEO_footer|hp=Vol. 4, pp. 1095-1096|date=1959|a1_last=Wenger|a1_first=John C|a2_last=|a2_first=}}

Latest revision as of 14:39, 23 August 2013

Henry A. Hunsicker Mennonite Year Book & Almanac
In 1851 the bishops Abraham Hunsicker and Israel Beidler and the preachers Henry A. Hunsicker and Abraham H, Grater separated from John H. Oberholtzer's Conference in Eastern Pennsylvania (later known as General Conference Mennonite Church). "But having a majority of the members and friends, both in Phoenixville and in Germantown to stand by us, we continued our services at both these places until 1875. After the Meeting Houses in Skippack and Providence were closed against us, we held services at school houses, and in some of the neighboring churches opened to us, until 1854 when we built a church at Freeland, now Collegeville, which was essentially a non-sectarian church, to be open for ministers in good standing in our own and other denominations, who chose to help the church of Christ. Our Church, as well as our school, were both flourishing. We added to the Ministry during these years, Francis Hunsicker, Jarret T. Preston, and Joseph H. Hendricks." (Quotation from Henry A. Hunsicker in the 1907 Mennonite Year Book and Almanac, p. 24.)

The church established by the Hunsicker group in 1854 was called the "Trinity Christian Society." In 1888 Hendricks and his church were received into the Reformed Church, which act displeased Henry A. Hunsicker.

The Hunsicker group were for a time known as Reformed Mennonites, at least they were called Reformed Mennonites at Germantown. But this name was already used by a radical sect of Mennonites in Lancaster County, the followers of John Herr, and the "Reformed" Mennonites of Germantown soon became General Conference Mennonites. Indeed the whole Hunsicker group disintegrated. The Collegeville Church became Reformed, the Lutherans acquired the Phoenixville property, and the Germantown Church united with the Eastern District of the General Conference Mennonites. Both Henry A. and Francis R. S. Hunsicker became Presbyterians.

[edit] Bibliography

Hunsicker, Abraham. A Statement of Facts, and Summary of Views on Morals and Religion, as Related with Suspension from the Mennonite Meeting 1851. Philadelphia, PA, 1851.


Author(s) John C Wenger
Date Published 1959


[edit] Cite This Article

MLA style

Wenger, John C. "Hunsicker Group." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1959. Web. 27 Aug 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Hunsicker_Group&oldid=95359.

APA style

Wenger, John C. (1959). Hunsicker Group. Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 27 August 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Hunsicker_Group&oldid=95359.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 4, pp. 1095-1096. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


©1996-2014 by the Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. All rights reserved.