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Kollumerzwaag, a hamlet in the Dutch province of Friesland, was once the location of a Mennonite congregation about which only scarce particulars are available. The various issues of the Dutch Naamlijst mention this congregation, which often was without a preacher. It is supposed to have been founded about 1600. The membership then numbering about 100. In 1695, when the Sociëteit of Friesland was founded, Kollumerzwaag also joined, having then about 50 members. It often was subsidized by the Conference of Friesland. In 1815 its meetinghouse had become dilapidated and was out of use, and in 1816 was transferred to Zwaagwesteinde and rebuilt there, being dedicated 6 May 1816 by H. A. Bosma, the last (untrained) preacher of Kollumerzwaag. In 1844 the congregation of Kollumerzwaag  was dissolved. The remaining members joined the congregation of Dantumawoude.

[edit] Bibliography

Buse, H. J. De verdwenen Doopsgezinde Gemeenten in Friesland. Reprint from De Vrije Fries 22 (1915): 11 f.

Doopsgezinde Bijdragen (1895): 12, 20; (1903): 165.

Naamlijst der tegenwoordig in dienst zijnde predikanten der Mennoniten in de vereenigde Nederlanden (Amsterdam, 1829): "Kerknieuws," 47.


Author(s) Nanne van der Zijpp
Date Published 1957


[edit] Cite This Article

MLA style

Zijpp, Nanne van der. "Kollumerzwaag (Friesland, Netherlands)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1957. Web. 19 Dec 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Kollumerzwaag_(Friesland,_Netherlands)&oldid=125995.

APA style

Zijpp, Nanne van der. (1957). Kollumerzwaag (Friesland, Netherlands). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 19 December 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Kollumerzwaag_(Friesland,_Netherlands)&oldid=125995.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 3, p. 216. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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