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Metamora Mennonite Church (Mennonite Church USA), originally known as the Partridge Creek or Springbay Church, was organized in 1833 by Christian Engel in the home of his son John Engel one mile west of Metamora. Christian Engel, the first [[Amish|Amish]] bishop in America west of [[Ohio (State)|Ohio]], served as bishop of this congregation until his death in 1838. The Partridge congregation at one time had 13 ordained ministers, four of whom were bishops. Services were held in the homes until 1854, when the Partridge brick church was built, which served until 1889, when a frame building was erected one mile east of Metamora. For many years services were held every other Sunday, alternating with the Roanoke Church.
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Metamora Mennonite Church (Mennonite Church USA), originally known as the Partridge Creek or Springbay Church, was organized in 1833 by Christian Engel in the home of his son John Engel one mile west of Metamora. Christian Engel, the first [[Amish Mennonites|Amish]] bishop in America west of [[Ohio (State)|Ohio]], served as bishop of this congregation until his death in 1838. The Partridge congregation at one time had 13 ordained ministers, four of whom were bishops. Services were held in the homes until 1854, when the Partridge brick church was built, which served until 1889, when a frame building was erected one mile east of Metamora. For many years services were held every other Sunday, alternating with the Roanoke Church.
  
 
The Metamora and Roanoke congregations together purchased an abandoned Baptist church building seven miles north of Eureka in 1905, rebuilt it, and called it the Harmony Church. When the Roanoke congregation built its own meetinghouse it left the Harmony work in charge of the Metamora congregation. Services were held regularly each alternate Sunday in the Metamora church. On intervening Sundays the congregation divided between the Union church near Washington, IL, and the Harmony church. In 1929 the Harmony and Union churches were closed. The Harmony building was moved to [[Pleasant Hill Mennonite Church (Morton, Illinois, USA)|Pleasant Hill]], near [[Morton (Illinois, USA)|Morton]], and was used by the congregation there as a house of worship.
 
The Metamora and Roanoke congregations together purchased an abandoned Baptist church building seven miles north of Eureka in 1905, rebuilt it, and called it the Harmony Church. When the Roanoke congregation built its own meetinghouse it left the Harmony work in charge of the Metamora congregation. Services were held regularly each alternate Sunday in the Metamora church. On intervening Sundays the congregation divided between the Union church near Washington, IL, and the Harmony church. In 1929 the Harmony and Union churches were closed. The Harmony building was moved to [[Pleasant Hill Mennonite Church (Morton, Illinois, USA)|Pleasant Hill]], near [[Morton (Illinois, USA)|Morton]], and was used by the congregation there as a house of worship.
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The membership of the Metamora congregation in 1955 was 388, with Roy Bucher as pastor and Howard J. Zehr as bishop. The congregation is a member of the [[Illinois Mennonite Conference (Mennonite Church USA) |Illinois Conference]]. H. R. Schertz (1886-1954) served as minister in 1917-1954, bishop 1941-1954, and outstanding leader of the Metamora Mennonite Church, with the exception of a period of about three years (1920-1923), when he served as superintendent of the [[Mennonite Home Mission (Chicago, Illinois, USA)|Chicago Home Mission]].
 
The membership of the Metamora congregation in 1955 was 388, with Roy Bucher as pastor and Howard J. Zehr as bishop. The congregation is a member of the [[Illinois Mennonite Conference (Mennonite Church USA) |Illinois Conference]]. H. R. Schertz (1886-1954) served as minister in 1917-1954, bishop 1941-1954, and outstanding leader of the Metamora Mennonite Church, with the exception of a period of about three years (1920-1923), when he served as superintendent of the [[Mennonite Home Mission (Chicago, Illinois, USA)|Chicago Home Mission]].
 
= Bibliography =
 
= Bibliography =
Hege, Christian and Christian Neff. <em>Mennonitisches Lexikon</em>. Frankfurt &amp; Weierhof: Hege; Karlsruhe; Schneider, 1913-1967: 111, 117.
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Hege, Christian and Christian Neff. <em>Mennonitisches Lexikon</em>, 4 vols. Frankfurt &amp; Weierhof: Hege; Karlsruhe: Schneider, 1913-1967: 111, 117.
 
{{GAMEO_footer|hp=Vol. 3, p. 658|date=1957|a1_last=Schertz|a1_first=H. R.|a2_last=Bender|a2_first=Harold S}}
 
{{GAMEO_footer|hp=Vol. 3, p. 658|date=1957|a1_last=Schertz|a1_first=H. R.|a2_last=Bender|a2_first=Harold S}}

Revision as of 06:10, 14 October 2013

Metamora Mennonite Church (Mennonite Church USA), originally known as the Partridge Creek or Springbay Church, was organized in 1833 by Christian Engel in the home of his son John Engel one mile west of Metamora. Christian Engel, the first Amish bishop in America west of Ohio, served as bishop of this congregation until his death in 1838. The Partridge congregation at one time had 13 ordained ministers, four of whom were bishops. Services were held in the homes until 1854, when the Partridge brick church was built, which served until 1889, when a frame building was erected one mile east of Metamora. For many years services were held every other Sunday, alternating with the Roanoke Church.

The Metamora and Roanoke congregations together purchased an abandoned Baptist church building seven miles north of Eureka in 1905, rebuilt it, and called it the Harmony Church. When the Roanoke congregation built its own meetinghouse it left the Harmony work in charge of the Metamora congregation. Services were held regularly each alternate Sunday in the Metamora church. On intervening Sundays the congregation divided between the Union church near Washington, IL, and the Harmony church. In 1929 the Harmony and Union churches were closed. The Harmony building was moved to Pleasant Hill, near Morton, and was used by the congregation there as a house of worship.

The membership of the Metamora congregation in 1955 was 388, with Roy Bucher as pastor and Howard J. Zehr as bishop. The congregation is a member of the Illinois Conference. H. R. Schertz (1886-1954) served as minister in 1917-1954, bishop 1941-1954, and outstanding leader of the Metamora Mennonite Church, with the exception of a period of about three years (1920-1923), when he served as superintendent of the Chicago Home Mission.

Bibliography

Hege, Christian and Christian Neff. Mennonitisches Lexikon, 4 vols. Frankfurt & Weierhof: Hege; Karlsruhe: Schneider, 1913-1967: 111, 117.


Author(s) H. R. Schertz
Harold S Bender
Date Published 1957


Cite This Article

MLA style

Schertz, H. R. and Harold S Bender. "Metamora Mennonite Church (Metamora, Illinois, USA)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1957. Web. 26 Dec 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Metamora_Mennonite_Church_(Metamora,_Illinois,_USA)&oldid=102513.

APA style

Schertz, H. R. and Harold S Bender. (1957). Metamora Mennonite Church (Metamora, Illinois, USA). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 26 December 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Metamora_Mennonite_Church_(Metamora,_Illinois,_USA)&oldid=102513.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 3, p. 658. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


©1996-2014 by the Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. All rights reserved.