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Alvin & Lilly Steckly family
Alvin Roy Steckly: deacon in the West Zion Mennonite Church near Carstairs, Alberta; born at Beaver Crossing, Nebraska, on 7 August 1905, and died of cancer on 23 January 1973. He was married to Mary Lilly Taylor on 25 February 1925. They were the parents of three sons and two daughters.

The Steckly family moved from Nebraska to a farm near Carstairs, Alberta, in 1912. Alvin attended school for one year in Nebraska, and received the rest of his elementary school education in Alberta. He accepted Christ as his Saviour at the age of 15, and was baptized and received as a member of the West Zion Mennonite Church. He became an active Sunday school worker, serving as teacher, chorister and Sunday School Superintendent. He was chosen by lot, and ordained a deacon in the West Zion Mennonite Church on 9 October 1939. He lived on a farm located about eight miles west of Carstairs. He was also a skilled carpenter and cabinet maker.

[edit] Bibliography

Harder, Richard, ed. West Zion Mennonite Church: Centennial Scrapbook, 1901-2001. Carstairs: West Zion Mennonite Church, 2000.

Obituary for Alvin Steckly in the Gospel Herald.

Regehr, T. D. Faith, Life and Witness in the Northwest, 1903-2003: Centennial History of the Northwest Mennonite Conference. Kitchener, ON: Pandora Press, 2003.

Stauffer, Ezra. History of the Alberta-Saskatchewan Mennonite Conference. Ryley, Alberta: Alberta-Saskatchewan Mennonite Cofnerence, 1960: 102.


Author(s) Ted D Regehr
Date Published December 2003


[edit] Cite This Article

MLA style

Regehr, Ted D. "Steckly, Alvin Roy (1905-1973)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. December 2003. Web. 31 Jul 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Steckly,_Alvin_Roy_(1905-1973)&oldid=120453.

APA style

Regehr, Ted D. (December 2003). Steckly, Alvin Roy (1905-1973). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 31 July 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Steckly,_Alvin_Roy_(1905-1973)&oldid=120453.




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